Brain Sarcoidosis – All You Need to Know and Exciting News

Brain sarcoidosis is a complex disease and its treatment in modern medicine is based on dealing with the symptoms, rather then addressing the causes which remain obscure. In sarcoidosis, the immune system is activated to fight a non-existent enemy, hence the name autoimmune.

This is an article that will be looking into the involvement of the Central Nervous System in sarcoidosis or Neurosarcoidosis.

Sarcoidosis may affect any part of our brain. CNS involvement occurs in 2-7% of patients. One of the most common symptoms in those affected by neurosarcoidosis is facial weakness (if the disease affects the nerves of the face). It can also cause disturbances in the ways our senses function (hearing, taste…).

One of the worst implications is the involvement of hypothalamus, which regulates our body weight, body synapse xt temperature and sleep.

Brain sarcoidosis diagnosis

Of all the forms of this disease, neurosarcoidosis is the most difficult to diagnose, because of the inaccessibility and the risk of biopsies of CNS lesions. That is why MRI scans are the first choice in health practitioners looking into brain involvement in sarcoidosis.

Brain sarcoidosis manifestations

Common manifestations of brain sarcoidosis include: Meningitis, Seizures, Cerebellar ataxia (loss of coordination), Psychiatric symptoms, Decreased hearing, Speech impairment, Loss of sense of smell, Dementia or delirium, Dizziness or vertigo (abnormal sensation of movement), Papilledema (optic disc swelling).

Brain Sarcoidosis – Optic nerve

This is the second most commonly involved cranial nerve in sarcoidosis (after the facial nerve). Optic nerve lesion occurs in 5% of patients with brain sarcoidosis. Visual symptoms of optic nerve involvement include blurred vision, field defects, and pupillary abnormalities. Examination of the optic fundi reveals characteristic sarcoid changes, including edema of the disc, optic neuritis, and optic atrophy secondary to granulomatous infiltration in brain sarcoidosis.

Brain sarcoidosis and the spinal cord

There are no rules to what part of the spinal cord can be involved in sarcoidosis. Clinical signs of spinal cord dysfunction include: paraparesis (weakness of the lower extremities), tetraparesis (weakness of all four limbs), back and leg pains, incontinence (inability to control excretory functions).

Brain sarcoidosis, as other types of this disease, is a subject of controversy. This is mainly due to the fact that there has been little or no advance in the filed for such a long time. Some alternative treatment methods, such as the Aden protocol [http://www.sarcoidosisremission.com/] Aden protocol, are reported to be successful in treating this mysterious disease. You can read more about it on the official home page [http://www.sarcoidosisremission.com/] of the protocol.

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